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Holly Wilder is a New York City based performer, choreographer, and filmmaker. She is founder and artistic director of the award-winning dance film company, Wilder Project.

She began her dance training at the age of three at D’Valda and Sirico Dance and Music Center in Connecticut, competing nationally with their company. Before high school, she moved to St. Louis, Missouri and continued her training at the Center of Creative Arts. There she was taught and mentored by Alvin Ailey's Alicia Graf and was a member of pre-professional dance companies, Ballet Eclectica and COCAdance, performing work by world-renowned choreographers such as Robert Battle, Anthony Tudor, Trey McIntyre, Camille A. Brown, Darrell Grand Moultrie, John Lehrer, and Kirven Boyd. She is a recipient of COCA’s Distinguished Alumni Award.

Holly later graduated Summa Cum Laude from The Boston Conservatory with a BFA in Contemporary Dance Performance. She was a recipient of the Julie Ince Thompson and Jan Veen scholarship awards and the Alumni Award for Academic Achievement, earning the second highest academic rank in her graduating class. While at The Boston Conservatory, Holly performed work by Claudia LaVista and Omar Currum, Karole Armitage, Adam Barruch, Danny Burcazeski, Margot Gelber, and Gianni Di Marco. Three of her own works were also performed on the Conservatory’s main stage.

Holly has studied at summer programs like Jacob's Pillow, The Movement Invention Project, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, Batsheva’s Gaga Intensive in Israel, and Perry-Mansfield, where she performed the lead role in Paul Taylor’s masterwork, Aureole

Some of her professional performance credits include Cassie in A Chorus Line at Compass Rose Theater in Maryland, Graziella/Dance and Fight Captain in West Side Story at SummerStage at Leonia in New Jersey, Ensemble/Frenchy understudy in Grease with Royal Caribbean International, principle dancer in the national tour of Debbie Allen’s musical Brothers of the Knight, the OceA Wilderness Ensemble residency at The Yard at Martha's Vineyard, and dancer with Thang Dao Dance Company in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. She was also a performer in the short film "A Smartphone Offenders Guide to Etiquette” directed by Mary John Frank, and was a lead dancer in the music videos for Grey by Torella, Happen Like That by Khary Durgans, Ayhauaska At Night by Big Wild, and Nightingale by Sara Kendall.

Holly has toured with the JUNTOS Collective, an international non-profit organization, to Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and San Francisco to teach and perform. She has choreographed three works that have been performed by the collective internationally.

Holly is currently on faculty at Westchester Ballet Center teaching tap. She has also been on faculty at Dance Management in NJ and Taps N Toes and Armonk Center for Dance in NY. She teaches classes in ballet, modern, contemporary, lyrical, jazz, tap, and musical theater. She has also taught workshops in Maine and Guatemala and is an award-winning competition choreographer.

She founded her dance film company, Wilder Project, with her cinematographer brother Duncan in 2015. They have since screened their dance films at over 20 film festivals and showings all over the US and Canada. Their film The Field received First Place at Verve Dance Film Festival, and their film undertow received the Audience Favorite Award and critical acclaim at the Philadelphia Screendance Festival. They have received music video commissions from artists like Jennah Bell, Jean Rohe, Stephanie Allen, and Bolivian pop star Luis Gamarra, and a film commission from Berklee School of Music. 

The company has performed live at Battery Dance Festival and INSITU Site Specific Dance Festival in NYC and venues like the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston and the Wild Project in Manhattan. They presented a multimedia collaboration with Hub New Music at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 2016. Holly is also on the selection committee of the LA Dance Film Festival. Wilder Project has been mentioned in Dance Magazine, The Boston Globe, and Cultural Weekly.